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Beatrix
Slaughter

Bio by Jessica Henderson

Zoe Logan, a.k.a. Bunny, seems like a sweet girl. Short spunky hair, winning smile and a bright career, the 25-year-old Soho architectural model-maker has a fondness for gardening, sewing and the child wizard Harry Potter. But it's her alterego, Beatrix Slaughter (a clever play on that other rabbit lovin' author Beatrix Potter) that you wouldn't want to meet on the street, or more specifically, on the track. That's when the 5'6'' jammer/blocker for the Bronx Gridlock—part of the Gotham Girls Roller Derby League—makes up what she lacks in height with fierce showmanship, "Being a jammer is like having a big bullseye on your face and body at all times," says Logan. "People just throw themselves at you."

With the league championship game on November 17th against The Queens of Pain, the anticipation and excitement of the big event is almost as grueling as Logan's four day a week practices. "It's scary," says Logan, "but the Gotham Girls currently rank fifth in the nation in the Women's Flat Track Roller Derby Association. So it's pretty cool. And within our league are four teams: Manhattan Mayhem, Queens of Pain, Brooklyn Bombshells and the Bronx Gridlock—we're 3-0."

Born in Tribeca, and raised there until she was five, "I think the first word I learned how to spell after my own name was 'pizza' from the pizza signs on the street" —Logan's family relocated to Hastings on Hudson, but the city was never far from their minds. "Manhattan has always been really central in my head and my identity," says Logan. "My trips to the city—to the Met, St. Marks Place, the New York Public Library—meant it was the first place I really kind of branched out and experienced things by myself."

So it makes sense that this is where Logan discovered her newest slammin' passion two years ago. "I think New York is one of the founding members of this new wave of roller derby, because New Yorkers like to be on top of what is interesting and new and avant-garde," says Logan, whose ice hockey history has translated well on wheels as she and 60 other girls bump, smash and crash their way across the track. "You have to make every minute count here. No one wastes time, we do what needs to be done and there's a lot more focus," explains Logan. "And that's sort of the New York motto, 'don't fuck around.'" Coming from someone who sometimes goes as Bunny, we're surprisingly intimidated—and we have the feeling that's just the way she likes it.

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